A reply from CEO of J.P. Morgan to a pretty girl seeking a rich husband

This has been shared on Facebook and posting it here. This is somehow an interesting message for women who try to find a rich husband or for women who are not happy of what they have.

 photo 552629_10151595818447903_922826219_n_zps33ea8162.jpg…. photo not mine…

A young and pretty lady posted this on a popular forum:

Title: What should I do to marry a rich guy?

I’m going to be honest of what I’m going to say here.
I’m 25 this year. I’m very pretty, have style and good taste. I wish to marry a guy with $500k annual salary or above.
You might say that I’m greedy, but an annual salary of $1M is considered only as middle class in New York.
My requirement is not high. Is there anyone in this forum who has an income of $500k annual salary? Are you all married?
I wanted to ask: what should I do to marry rich persons like you?
Among those I’ve dated, the richest is $250k annual income, and it seems that this is my upper limit.
If someone is going to move into high cost residential area on the west of New York City Garden(?), $250k annual income is not enough.
I’m here humbly to ask a few questions:

1) Where do most rich bachelors hang out? (Please list down the names and addresses of bars, restaurant, gym)
2) Which age group should I target?
3) Why most wives of the riches are only average-looking? I’ve met a few girls who don’t have looks and are not interesting, but they are able to marry rich guys.
4) How do you decide who can be your wife, and who can only be your girlfriend? (my target now is to get married)
Ms. Pretty

A philosophical reply from CEO of J.P. Morgan:

Dear Ms. Pretty,
I have read your post with great interest. Guess there are lots of girls out there who have similar questions like yours. Please allow me to analyse your situation as a professional investor.
My annual income is more than $500k, which meets your requirement, so I hope everyone believes that I’m not wasting time here.
From the standpoint of a business person, it is a bad decision to marry you. The answer is very simple, so let me explain.
Put the details aside, what you’re trying to do is an exchange of “beauty” and “money” : Person A provides beauty, and Person B pays for it, fair and square.
However, there’s a deadly problem here, your beauty will fade, but my money will not be gone without any good reason. The fact is, my income might increase from year to year, but you can’t be prettier year after year.
Hence from the viewpoint of economics, I am an appreciation asset, and you are a depreciation asset. It’s not just normal depreciation, but exponential depreciation. If that is your only asset, your value will be much worse 10 years later.
By the terms we use in Wall Street, every trading has a position, dating with you is also a “trading position”.
If the trade value dropped we will sell it and it is not a good idea to keep it for long term – same goes with the marriage that you wanted. It might be cruel to say this, but in order to make a wiser decision any assets with great depreciation value will be sold or “leased”.
Anyone with over $500k annual income is not a fool; we would only date you, but will not marry you. I would advice that you forget looking for any clues to marry a rich guy. And by the way, you could make yourself to become a rich person with $500k annual income.This has better chance than finding a rich fool.

Hope this reply helps.

signed,
J.P. Morgan CEO

When You Know Your Marriage Is Over

When It’s Just Another Fight, and When It’s Over is such an interesting article I read today. Thanks to the original source, I am able to share some of the good advice when you know your marriage is over.

People have various reasons why they choose to let their long years of marriage go. If things go wrong, they often turn to divorce which I now understand deeply why. Both married couple should know when their marriage is over and by then, it is either they seek advice from therapists for marriage counseling or go the other way. Consider the following tips below if you are in this situation and I hope this help you a bit.

Time to End the Relationship?
And if so, how do you break the news in a way that does the least emotional damage? Marriage therapists offer advice:

• Peer into the future. Talk to a lawyer and an accountant, research what an apartment would cost, ask a real-estate agent to estimate a sale price for your house, says Susan Pease Gadoua, a licensed social worker who specializes in helping couples with relationship strife. ‘You will either become energized or depressed,’ she says, ‘and that will be telling.’

• Tell your spouse early. As soon as you start losing your commitment to the relationship, speak up, therapists say. ‘Bring up divorce when you still don’t want it,’ says Bill Doherty, director of the Minnesota Couples on the Brink Project.

• Do therapy on a trial basis. If you think your marriage could be salvaged, find an objective professional and agree on a trial period, typically six months to a year.

• Expect the worst. Anticipate that your spouse will be shocked and behave badly. Regardless, listen calmly—for more than one conversation—to give your spouse a chance to respond.

• Stick around. If you’re the one leaving, don’t move out or cut off contact too quickly. Some therapists even suggest continuing to live together for two to six months, if that’s what your spouse wants, to ease the transition, Ms. Gadoua says.

15 New Uses Of Tea

Tea drinkers would be so happy to know these 15 new uses of their favorite drink. A great practical article on Yahoo Shine that saves a lot of your time and money if you would follow what is written here.
1. Clean carpets: Clean up musty, dirty carpets by sprinkling dry, used green tea leaves on the carpet. Let them work their magic for about 10 minutes, then vacuum them up. Delicate Persian and Oriental rugs can also benefit from a sprinkling of tea leaves. In this case, sprinkle nearly dry, used whole tea leaves on the rugs, and gently sweep them away.
2. Shine wood floors: The tannins in black tea can help shine and color hardwood flooring. Follow your regular floor cleaning routine by carefully rubbing some brewed tea into the floor (don’t use too much water on hardwood flooring) and letting it air dry.
3. Polish furniture: Brewed tea also can help clean and shine wood furniture. The tannins in tea will re-color light spots and scratches in wood surfaces. Dip a soft cloth in a small amount of strongly-brewed tea, and use it to wipe down scratched tables, chairs, and more. Woodworker Jim McNamara suggested using “regular orange pekoe (Lipton’s) or other dark tea” in Woodworker’s Gazette.
4. Clean mirrors and windows: Tea can remove stubborn, greasy fingerprints from glass, and make it sparkle. Simply rub a damp teabag on the glass or fill a spray bottle with brewed tea.
5. Clean toilet stains: Rumor has it that used tea leaves can magically remove stubborn stains in the bottom of the toilet bowl. Just leave them in the toilet for several hours, then flush the toilet and brush the bowl.
6. Soothe a sunburn: Tea can soothe sunburns and other minor burns. Dr. Oz suggests sponging sunburned skin with “cooled chamomile tea” for it’s anti-inflammatory effect. Don’t try this if skin is broken.
7. Soothe tired eyes: Warm, wet tea bags can reduce puffiness and soothe pain around tired eyes — and tea bags on your eyes look a little less ridiculous than cucumber slices.
8. Soothe bleeding gums: After a tooth extraction or when an older child loses a tooth, try putting a cold, wet tea bag in the mouth where the tooth was lost and bite down on it. According to the Cleveland Clinic, “The tannic acid in tea helps healing blood clots to form (blood clots function similarly to a scab on an open wound). It can reduce bleeding and soothe pain.”
9. Shine dry hair: Brewed tea makes a good conditioner for dry hair. Rinse with (unsweetened) tea and leave to dry for a while, then rinse again with water.
10. Improve skin: The Mayo Clinic suggests that herbal tea ingredients chamomile and calendula can help soothe dermatitis when prepared as a topical cream. Consult with a qualified health practitioner before using these remedies.
11. Soothe acne: Some acne sufferers swear by washing their faces with green tea because of its mildly antiseptic properties. Dr. Andrew Weil suggests washing with calendula flower tea as a natural alternative to benzoyl peroxide.
12. Tenderize meat: Marinate tough meat in black tea to make it more tender.
13. Add to compost: Pouring strong tea into a compost bin will help speed up the process and encourage more friendly bacteria to grow, improving the compost.
14. Help houseplants: Occasionally use brewed tea instead of water to feed ferns and other houseplants that like rich, acidic soil. Spread used tea leaves around rosebushes, then add mulch and water. The tannic acid and other nutrients will benefit the plants. A few used teabags in the bottom of a planter can help the soil retain water, and adds valuable nutrients.
15. Dye fabrics: Green and black teas have long been used in dyes for fabric and paper, particularly for generating a beige, faux-antique look.

Five surprising places to find love

ayme n johnny Pictures, Images and PhotosBy Susan Johnston

Love in the snow lane
For Marie Melsheimer, 35, love didn’t walk in; it slid into the back of her car during an icy winter in Bend, OR 17 years ago. “I was stopped at a stop sign and my car stalled,” says Melsheimer. “His truck slid into the back of my car and he broke my taillights and dented my bumper.” The guy offered to fix her car, so they exchanged phone numbers. She blames his inexperience with the icy road conditions for their fender bender, while he blames her car stalling. Regardless of who was at fault, Melsheimer says it was love at first sight. “I was on my way to my grandmother’s house,” she recalls, “and after leaving him, I arrived there to tell her I had just met the man I was going to marry.” True to both their words, he fixed her tail lights — and they married several years later.
A purr-fect match
Plenty of romances come courtesy of some trusty canine companions at the dog park. Without daily walks, though, cat owners don’t have a similar excuse to socialize. That didn’t stop Whitney Shore, 26, and her now-boyfriend from striking up a conversation at the vet’s office. “I was bringing one of my cats in after work on a Tuesday, and he was bringing in one of his cats, too,” says Shore. “I noticed him when he walked in and was pretty excited when he sat down a couple of seats down from me. We started talking and continued talking for the next hour.” Though he’d already left by the time Shore’s appointment wrapped up, the clever cat-lover pieced together details from their conversation and left a note on Shore’s car with his phone number. “We met for brunch that Sunday, which turned into us going to the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, which turned into dinner, which then turned into a movie,” she says. “All told, our first date was 10 hours… and the rest is history!”
Sparks fly at 30,000 feet
Scott Trosclair, 29, was flying to Oakland, CA when a girl with big, grayish-green eyes sat down in the seat next to him. Her name was Emily, he learned, and they struck up a conversation, chatting about his move from New York City to the Bay Area and the fact that they were both wearing Rainbow sandals. Though they talked for the entirety of the flight, Trosclair waited until the last second to ask for her number in the baggage claim area, just in case she turned him down. Fortunately, she didn’t — and four years later, Trosclair planned a surprise proposal on another shared flight. “We met flying from Orange County to Oakland, so I proposed on a flight going the opposite path,” says Trosclair. “When we landed, I had her brother, mother and her mom’s boyfriend meet up with us in a limo.” Since they met while traveling, the pair included some airplane and travel motifs in their wedding this past spring.
Tweet love
Even social networks designed exclusively for online conversation can lead to real-world connections. Just ask MoniQue Shaldjian, 24, who met her fiancé Mike at a Tweetup in Phoenix last year. “I had seen his Twitter handle in a retweet here or there,” she remembers. “So, I’m at this event, and I got a tweet from him that said, ‘don’t leave, I want to meet you.’” She went to shake his hand and he went for a bear hug. Later, they both went to a bar to chat, and the conversation flowed as if they were old friends. Although Mike didn’t ask for MoniQue’s phone number that night, they started following each other on Twitter and she texted him after seeing he’d tweeted his phone number to a client. Things took off from there. MoniQue says that she “never imagined” she’d meet her husband at a Tweetup, but their shared interest in social media has helped the couple to bond.
Connecting on a commuter train
Long train rides may seem like a waste of time for tired commuters, but Holly Johnson, 27, actually met her husband Jesse while commuting from Boston to Worcester, MA. “He said that he saw me in the window and thought I was pretty,” Johnson recalls. But she wasn’t looking for a love connection, so when Jesse asked to sit next to her, she answered: “I don’t know why people ask if they can sit next to someone else — it’s a free country.” Still, it’ a long ride to Worcester, so the two started chatting about politics and discovered they shared some similar viewpoints. Jesse offered Holly a ride from the train station, but she insisted on taking a cab instead. “I thought he was a weirdo stalker,” she admits. “As it turns out, he really was just being nice.” Holly reluctantly gave him her cell number, not expecting to hear from him. However, Jesse called the next day. Now, eight years later, they’re married and have a child together.
Susan Johnston is a freelance writer who has written for The Boston Globe, The Christian Science Monitor, Parade, and many other publications. She met her boyfriend online but loves hearing unusual “how we met” stories.
Article courtesy of Happen magazine.

5 lessons learned from 18 years of marriage

Another great article I read on yahoo on how to keep your marriage alive throughout the years! I share this here so my readers who missed reading it on yahoo are able to read it.
1. A strong marriage is built of tiny actions.
“It’s the little things.” Such a cliche! Such bad sentence construction! And such truth.
Related: 35 for 35 — Things I have learned in my 35 years
Each time you discuss instead of demand, you strengthen your marriage. Same goes for speaking with respect instead of sarcasm, and listening instead of dismissing, and engaging instead of eye-rolling.
Each action is like a brick. You choose whether to use it to build a foundation or a wall.
2. But don’t forget the grand gesture.
Buying flowers or surprising your spouse with a vacation, an iPad, or a day off from dishwashing won’t make your marriage. But it will cause your partner to snap out of the day-to-day routine and take notice. Sometimes that’s all it takes to get the ball rolling in a very pleasant direction.
3. Never underestimate the importance of a good laugh.
Sometimes life as a grownup can be hard, boring, and downright drudgery. Another cliche fits here: “If I didn’t laugh, I’d probably cry.” So laugh. A lot.
Related: Marriage advice for new parents — 7 ways to baby-proof your relationship
What do you both find funny? Comedies? Jon Stewart? Silly t-shirts? Private jokes? Sneezing pandas? Write a “funny” list, then commit yourself to experiencing at least one of these things together every day. You’ll thank me.
4. All good marriages have a supporting cast.
There’s an odd fallacy about marriage (middle-class, American marriage, perhaps) that it should somehow stand on its own. If two people love each other, have shared values, a little chemistry, a decent job, maybe a kid or two…that they should be able to figure it out. That a good marriage can withstand life’s slings and arrows, if not unscathed, then at least intact.
Guess what? Life’s a lot bigger than two people. Sooner or later, a sneaker wave will knock you down, and you’ll need a hand to find your balance again. Perhaps it will be something small, like a messy house or a bad habit. Or something big: job loss, a health crisis. It may be something good: starting a new business, or winning the lottery. Or something bad: a death in the family, or an affair.
Whatever it is, there are people who can help.
Everyone’s supporting cast looks different. Some include a housecleaner or a babysitter. Others include a marriage counselor or a psychiatrist. Some need a financial advisor. Some just need their extended family or their friends. But everyone needs someone.
Related: 9 tips to spice up your marriage
5. Treat your spouse as you hope your children will treat theirs.
Little eyes are watching. Little ears are listening. And little minds and hearts are learning about partnership and marriage from your example.
I say this not to promote guilt, paranoia or dishonesty. The worst thing we could do is to project a facade of shiny perfection to our kids. They’re smarter than that, and such playacting hurts and confuses them.
But it’s worth remembering that kids really do follow our lead, and we owe it to them to be mindful about what we’re teaching. And we owe it to ourselves to dig deep for the good stuff. We’re worth it.
I’d love to hear your pithy marriage wisdom. What have you learned so far?
– By Asha Dornfest

Toddler Gear: The Only 5 Items You Need

I hate it when I stepped or tripped into my girl’s toys. Not only it hurts my feet but sometimes I fell down once I step on her toys. It pissed me off honestly, sometimes I wish we didn’t buy her toys because she doesn’t clean up after her mess. We end up sleeping at night with all the toys cluttered all over our place. When we need to get up at night, possibility is we fall down for stepping into her toys.
I found this article this morning stating the only 5 things necessary to keep around for the baby. You see no mention of plastic toys here which for me is an awesome idea, keep it simple and clean is what I want to do.
1. Car Seat
Unless you plan to stay home all summer, you’ll need a car seat. If you haven’t already done so, you’ll also need to upgrade your infant seat to a larger one to safely accommodate your growing child. And don’t forget, experts recommend you buy a new car seat rather than borrow a used one since safety standards are constantly changing.
2. Crib
Even though my toddler manages to nap on a cot at day care, she still needs a crib at night. My pediatrician recently reminded me that parents need to shift their kids to a toddler bed or purchase a crib tent once their youngsters start climbing out of their cribs.
3. Stroller
Personally, I find a stroller indispensable because I live in New York City and walk everywhere. Once I move to the suburbs, I may feel differently. But I imagine a set of wheels are helpful no matter where you live since little feet tire easily.
3. Sippy Cups
Drinking from an open cup can be tricky for young toddlers. Many can do it, but not without frequent spills. So unless you like cleaning up after your child, some form of sippy or straw cup is quite helpful.
4. Potty
When a toddler starts showing signs she’s ready to get rid of her diapers, you’ll want a potty to help make the process move along more smoothly.
5. Crayons
Hands down, my favorite toddler toy is a simple box of crayons. Steal some paper from your printer and you can transform your little mess maker into a regular Picasso. You can also ditch the flashcards and use the crayons to illustrate your own alphabet and set of numbers.
Of course, you’ll also need clothing and diapers. But I didn’t include these on the list since I don’t consider them toddler gear.
You’re also probably thinking I forgot about the high chair, changing table and even the toddler utensils. Nope. I let my daughter sit on a regular chair at the dining room table. I change her diapers on a towel on the bed. (Sometimes I just do it while she’s standing up in the bathroom.) And she’s quite happy using our regular silverware, provided she gets a salad fork and tea spoon.
Finally, I’ll admit that toddlers need books too. But that’s what the library is for.
What toddler items can’t you live without?

Traps To Avoid When Shopping At The Mall

Another great article that I’d like to share here from Yahoo. This was written by a Yahoo contributor. I don’t want to miss posting it here to for I know a lot of people or most women love to shop and they would like to grab the chance or the opportunity when they can in order to save money but little do they know, most of what the mall is offering are just traps. Read and so you can learn something from this informative article here.

Delayed Coupon
A recent shopping trap involves giving customers a coupon at the end of a purchase. The coupon may become active in the next day, week or month, tempting shoppers to return and buy more than they had initially planned. This shopping trap can be avoided by searching for online coupons that can be applied that very day and then bringing them along.

Scratch Cards
Another gimmick that mall stores have been using recently is scratch cards reminiscent of lottery scratch cards. To lure shoppers into the store, the scratch cards are handed out to passersby. There are no losing cards, which grants everyone the joy of a win. And once the shopper enters the store with a $5 scratch card, he is likely to fall into the shopping trap of buying something he wasn’t planning on buying that day at all.
Save 15% on $75
Coupons that only come into effect when the consumer spends enough money are becoming more and more common in mall stores. Typically, the offers are made to club members — shoppers who signed up to receive coupons in the mail. Though reserved for repeat customers, such coupons present an obvious shopping trap, one that’s irresistible to someone who likes that store enough to become a club member. Seasonal shopping, four times a year, can help shoppers buy everything they need at one time and make use of such coupons only when they need them.
Save 15% Today
There isn’t a store in a mall that doesn’t offer 15% at the time of checkout if you’ll apply for the store credit card. I’ve even come across instances when the proverbial “would you like to save 15% by applying for our card today?” has been replaced with a tantalizing “would you like to save 15%?” This shopping trap should be avoided for the simple reason that spending cash is psychologically more difficult than swiping a plastic card.
Cash Back or Rebate
Some store cards will offer you a rebate or cash-back bonus for every dollar you spend. Such bonuses are low, typically earning you $1 for every $1,000 spent, money which you can only spend by revisiting the store. Then, once back, you’re likely to spend far more than your measly rebate.
Up to 50% Off
Mall stores often try to lure us in with tempting sale signs, such as 50% off. But when words like “up to” or “no more than” come before or after the number, the appeal changes drastically. Then, it’s easy for us to fall into the shopping trap of paying a higher price, especially since the item we’ve spent time choosing is probably on sale too, though not for the higher (poster-perfect) amount. To avoid this shopping trap, read all signs carefully.
Buy 1 Get 1 at 1/2 Price
I’ve found this shopping trap in a wide range of mall stores. The buy 1 get 1 free promotion is one we’re all so familiar with that stores use it to get our business. This can become a shopping trap when the second item is not actually offered for free but for half its price. Mall signs will typically present the “half price” in small numbers that can easily be missed or mistaken for shorthand for buy 1 get 2. Once more, the way to avoid this shopping trap is to read signs carefully or ask the store clerk for clarification.

Sale Rack Misfit
Sale racks may be great for bargain hunters, but they can also be terribly disappointing when a full-price item accidentally ends up on them. Rather than try on clothing you may be unable to afford, it is best to compare the price tags of surrounding items on a sale rack. Most likely, sale items will have a sticker on them to indicate the price reduction. The full-price misfit will then become glaringly obvious.
Lifted from its ORIGINAL SOURCE

25 Manners Every Child Should Know

Does your child knows at least few of these manners listed below? I must say, my big girl is one grateful child and that she knows the basic manners that she’d learn before  she can even speak. I taught her how to be courteous and polite with older people because how she interact or behave reflects the behavior of the parents. It shows the character of people living in the house. And when she grows up, people will notice that she is a child any parents can be proud to have. Here’s a very interesting article I found on yahoo this morning and I would like to share it here so every parent visitor in this blog can read.
Your child’s rude ‘tude isn’t always intentional. Sometimes kids just don’t realize it’s impolite to interrupt, pick their nose, or loudly observe that the lady walking in front of them has a large behind. And in the hustle and bustle of daily life, busy moms and dads don’t always have the time to focus on etiquette. But if you reinforce these 25 must-do manners, you’ll raise a polite, kind, well-liked child.-
Manner #1
When asking for something, say “Please.”
Manner #2
When receiving something, say “Thank you.”
Manner #3
Do not interrupt grown-ups who are speaking with each other unless there is an emergency. They will notice you and respond when they are finished talking.
Manner #4
If you do need to get somebody’s attention right away, the phrase “excuse me” is the most polite way for you to enter the conversation.
Manner #5
When you have any doubt about doing something, ask permission first. It can save you from many hours of grief later.
Manner #6
The world is not interested in what you dislike. Keep negative opinions to yourself, or between you and your friends, and out of earshot of adults.
Manner #7
Do not comment on other people’s physical characteristics unless, of course, it’s to compliment them, which is always welcome.
Manner #8
When people ask you how you are, tell them and then ask them how they are.
Manner #9
When you have spent time at your friend’s house, remember to thank his or her parents for having you over and for the good time you had.
Manner #10
Knock on closed doors — and wait to see if there’s a response — before entering.
Manner #11
When you make a phone call, introduce yourself first and then ask if you can speak with the person you are calling.
Manner #12
Be appreciative and say “thank you” for any gift you receive. In the age of e-mail, a handwritten thank-you note can have a powerful effect.
Manner #13
Never use foul language in front of adults. Grown-ups already know all those words, and they find them boring and unpleasant.
Manner #14
Don’t call people mean names.
Manner #15
Do not make fun of anyone for any reason. Teasing shows others you are weak, and ganging up on someone else is cruel.
Manner #16
Even if a play or an assembly is boring, sit through it quietly and pretend that you are interested. The performers and presenters are doing their best.
Manner #17
If you bump into somebody, immediately say “Excuse me.”
Manner #18
Cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze, and don’t pick your nose in public.
Manner #19
As you walk through a door, look to see if you can hold it open for someone else.
Manner #20
If you come across a parent, a teacher, or a neighbor working on something, ask if you can help. If they say “yes,” do so — you may learn something new.
Manner #21
When an adult asks you for a favor, do it without grumbling and with a smile.
Manner #22
When someone helps you, say “thank you.” That person will likely want to help you again. This is especially true with teachers!
Manner #23
Use eating utensils properly. If you are unsure how to do so, ask your parents to teach you or watch what adults do.
Manner #24
Keep a napkin on your lap; use it to wipe your mouth when necessary.
Manner #25
Don’t reach for things at the table; ask to have them passed.
Originally published in the March 2011 issue of Parents magazine.

Lifted from its Orignal Source