“Mama” Is Her First Word

Nothing is more flattering than hearing your baby’s first uttered word, “Mama”. Baby M can now say the word. Her dada must have taught her very well for she learned it very quickly at age 8 months. Babies usually find it easy to say the word, ‘pa rather than mama. Thanks to the dada for consistently teaching our baby M with the “mama” word.

It would be so unfair on mother’s side if the baby would call his/her daddy first before the mother for it is the mother that takes good care of her children, look after their needs, give them tender loving care and most of all it is the mother that attends sick children, works 24/7 without a day off, leave or compensation. But despite all these, it’s baby’s laughter that could pay back the mother of all her hardwork she’s done to her baby/kids.

“Great Mommy”

Two words from my better half is what it takes for me to feel appreciated of what I did to my kids. Although at times I feel all my energy are sucked out from me yet I see the blessings and the goodness of being a mommy to these two wonderfully created human beings in my life.

There were times when I felt exhausted but I should not mind it because what I got is precious and I cannot put a price tag on them. Last night when we were about to sleep, those two great words came out from my husband’s mouth, “great mommy” just made my night. I confirmed what he said and yes, I heard it right. I was in heaven pinakalit gud! At least he had seen all the hard work and tender loving care I showed to our girls. He absolutely makes me feel appreciated, really!

Toddler Gear: The Only 5 Items You Need

I hate it when I stepped or tripped into my girl’s toys. Not only it hurts my feet but sometimes I fell down once I step on her toys. It pissed me off honestly, sometimes I wish we didn’t buy her toys because she doesn’t clean up after her mess. We end up sleeping at night with all the toys cluttered all over our place. When we need to get up at night, possibility is we fall down for stepping into her toys.
I found this article this morning stating the only 5 things necessary to keep around for the baby. You see no mention of plastic toys here which for me is an awesome idea, keep it simple and clean is what I want to do.
1. Car Seat
Unless you plan to stay home all summer, you’ll need a car seat. If you haven’t already done so, you’ll also need to upgrade your infant seat to a larger one to safely accommodate your growing child. And don’t forget, experts recommend you buy a new car seat rather than borrow a used one since safety standards are constantly changing.
2. Crib
Even though my toddler manages to nap on a cot at day care, she still needs a crib at night. My pediatrician recently reminded me that parents need to shift their kids to a toddler bed or purchase a crib tent once their youngsters start climbing out of their cribs.
3. Stroller
Personally, I find a stroller indispensable because I live in New York City and walk everywhere. Once I move to the suburbs, I may feel differently. But I imagine a set of wheels are helpful no matter where you live since little feet tire easily.
3. Sippy Cups
Drinking from an open cup can be tricky for young toddlers. Many can do it, but not without frequent spills. So unless you like cleaning up after your child, some form of sippy or straw cup is quite helpful.
4. Potty
When a toddler starts showing signs she’s ready to get rid of her diapers, you’ll want a potty to help make the process move along more smoothly.
5. Crayons
Hands down, my favorite toddler toy is a simple box of crayons. Steal some paper from your printer and you can transform your little mess maker into a regular Picasso. You can also ditch the flashcards and use the crayons to illustrate your own alphabet and set of numbers.
Of course, you’ll also need clothing and diapers. But I didn’t include these on the list since I don’t consider them toddler gear.
You’re also probably thinking I forgot about the high chair, changing table and even the toddler utensils. Nope. I let my daughter sit on a regular chair at the dining room table. I change her diapers on a towel on the bed. (Sometimes I just do it while she’s standing up in the bathroom.) And she’s quite happy using our regular silverware, provided she gets a salad fork and tea spoon.
Finally, I’ll admit that toddlers need books too. But that’s what the library is for.
What toddler items can’t you live without?

25 Manners Every Child Should Know

Does your child knows at least few of these manners listed below? I must say, my big girl is one grateful child and that she knows the basic manners that she’d learn before  she can even speak. I taught her how to be courteous and polite with older people because how she interact or behave reflects the behavior of the parents. It shows the character of people living in the house. And when she grows up, people will notice that she is a child any parents can be proud to have. Here’s a very interesting article I found on yahoo this morning and I would like to share it here so every parent visitor in this blog can read.
Your child’s rude ‘tude isn’t always intentional. Sometimes kids just don’t realize it’s impolite to interrupt, pick their nose, or loudly observe that the lady walking in front of them has a large behind. And in the hustle and bustle of daily life, busy moms and dads don’t always have the time to focus on etiquette. But if you reinforce these 25 must-do manners, you’ll raise a polite, kind, well-liked child.-
Manner #1
When asking for something, say “Please.”
Manner #2
When receiving something, say “Thank you.”
Manner #3
Do not interrupt grown-ups who are speaking with each other unless there is an emergency. They will notice you and respond when they are finished talking.
Manner #4
If you do need to get somebody’s attention right away, the phrase “excuse me” is the most polite way for you to enter the conversation.
Manner #5
When you have any doubt about doing something, ask permission first. It can save you from many hours of grief later.
Manner #6
The world is not interested in what you dislike. Keep negative opinions to yourself, or between you and your friends, and out of earshot of adults.
Manner #7
Do not comment on other people’s physical characteristics unless, of course, it’s to compliment them, which is always welcome.
Manner #8
When people ask you how you are, tell them and then ask them how they are.
Manner #9
When you have spent time at your friend’s house, remember to thank his or her parents for having you over and for the good time you had.
Manner #10
Knock on closed doors — and wait to see if there’s a response — before entering.
Manner #11
When you make a phone call, introduce yourself first and then ask if you can speak with the person you are calling.
Manner #12
Be appreciative and say “thank you” for any gift you receive. In the age of e-mail, a handwritten thank-you note can have a powerful effect.
Manner #13
Never use foul language in front of adults. Grown-ups already know all those words, and they find them boring and unpleasant.
Manner #14
Don’t call people mean names.
Manner #15
Do not make fun of anyone for any reason. Teasing shows others you are weak, and ganging up on someone else is cruel.
Manner #16
Even if a play or an assembly is boring, sit through it quietly and pretend that you are interested. The performers and presenters are doing their best.
Manner #17
If you bump into somebody, immediately say “Excuse me.”
Manner #18
Cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze, and don’t pick your nose in public.
Manner #19
As you walk through a door, look to see if you can hold it open for someone else.
Manner #20
If you come across a parent, a teacher, or a neighbor working on something, ask if you can help. If they say “yes,” do so — you may learn something new.
Manner #21
When an adult asks you for a favor, do it without grumbling and with a smile.
Manner #22
When someone helps you, say “thank you.” That person will likely want to help you again. This is especially true with teachers!
Manner #23
Use eating utensils properly. If you are unsure how to do so, ask your parents to teach you or watch what adults do.
Manner #24
Keep a napkin on your lap; use it to wipe your mouth when necessary.
Manner #25
Don’t reach for things at the table; ask to have them passed.
Originally published in the March 2011 issue of Parents magazine.

Lifted from its Orignal Source